WHAT THE EXPERTS SAY


 

Mt. Sinai Medical Center

Samin Sharma, MD


“Another subgroup which that we have identified is patients who have had prior bypass surgery and their grafts are occluded. The native vessels are also very heavily calcified. Sometimes the angiogram may not look heavily calcified but they behave like a heavily calcified lesion, are very tough to open and/or deliver a stent.”

 

Scripps Clinic

Paul Teirstein, MD


“If you’re wondering if your patient has calcifications in their coronaries the current angiogram is usually the most helpful. Conducting a pre-procedure IVUS can be a good way to determine if you’re in for a tough calcified lesion. Sometimes patients come with CT scans that show high calcium scores which can be an indication as well.”

 

Belfast Trust

Colm Hanratty, MD


“I think those are the main ones where a patient is old, especially in the presence of diabetes and chronic kidney disease. The presence of peripheral vascular disease is another indication that they are more than likely to have a calcific coronary atheroma.”

 

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