Will my insurance cover the procedure?

Most insurance covers the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure and placement of a stent.

Will my insurance cover the procedure?

Can I reverse coronary artery disease (CAD) with lifestyle changes like diet and exercise?

Coronary artery disease (CAD) may be managed with a combination of lifestyle changes, exercise, diet, and medical treatment. You can have a positive impact on some risk factors by quitting smoking, taking steps to lower cholesterol, exercising regularly, eating a “heart-healthy” diet, keeping high blood pressure and diabetes under control, and seeing your doctor regularly.

Lifestyle changes alone cannot treat your CAD completely, and if you really want to restore blood flow you may need percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

It is important that you talk with your doctor about which treatment is the right one for you and that you understand all of the risks and benefits.

Can I reverse coronary artery disease (CAD) with lifestyle changes like diet and exercise?

What do I do if I’m not happy with the medication I have been prescribed?

If you are not happy with the medication you have been prescribed, it is important that you discuss this matter with your general practitioner or heart doctor. Minimally invasive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can fully restore your blood flow, whereas medication only masks your symptoms. It is important to talk to your doctor to see if percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the right treatment for you and that you understand all of the risks and benefits.

What do I do if I’m not happy with the medication I have been prescribed?

How is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) different from medical management of coronary artery disease (CAD)?

Percutaneous coronary intervention is a minimally invasive interventional technology that treats and helps to prevent CAD symptoms from coming back. Medical management can treat your symptoms, but it can’t take the blockage away.

How is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) different from medical management of coronary artery disease (CAD)?

If I’ve been rejected for heart bypass before, does that mean I can’t have percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)?

If you were rejected for heart bypass or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery before, you may not have been considered for minimally invasive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at the time, and might not have been reconsidered since. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a minimally invasive advanced technology that is appropriate for more patients now than before. It is important that you discuss your treatment choices with your doctor to see if percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is right for you.

If I’ve been rejected for heart bypass before, does that mean I can’t have percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)?

How is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) different from heart bypass?

Heart bypass requires open-heart surgery, while percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a minimally invasive procedure that is done by inserting a catheter into your groin or arm to treat your coronary artery disease (CAD).

How is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) different from heart bypass?

What can make me eligible for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)?

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a minimally invasive treatment that has evolved rapidly and offers outstanding, reliable results for a broader range of patients than ever before, including patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), complex CAD, and patients with CTO. You may also be eligible for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) if you have previously been rejected for CABG, or are currently on medical management.

What can make me eligible for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)?

Is complex percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) only for complex coronary artery disease (CAD) patients?

Complex percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is for any patients that would benefit from restoring blood flow by opening up blocked coronary arteries. 

It is important that you talk with your doctor about which treatment is the right one for you and that you understand all of the risks and benefits.

Is complex percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) only for complex coronary artery disease (CAD) patients?

Who will determine which treatment choice is right for my coronary artery disease (CAD)?

As soon as you experience CAD symptoms it is important that you talk to your general practitioner or heart doctor. After diagnosis, your doctor will refer you to an interventional cardiologist who will determine which treatment is right for you.

Who will determine which treatment choice is right for my coronary artery disease (CAD)?

How can I get referred to a complex percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) specialist?

It is important that you talk to your cardiologist or interventional cardiologist about getting referred for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Your heart doctor will perform a series of tests to determine your diagnosis, and you may be referred to a complex PCI specialist to determine which treatment is for you.

How can I get referred to a complex percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) specialist?

How does the procedure typically work?

The percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure is typically an outpatient procedure, but may require a short stay. Typical recovery times vary, but you may be able to leave the same day or day after your procedure.

How does the procedure typically work?

Is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) right for you?

Is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) right for you?

Use this simple discussion guide to start a conversation with your doctor.

Is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) right for you?

Which treatments are right for you?

Before talking to your doctor, take an interactive treatment quiz to find out which treatment options might be available to you.

Which treatments are right for you?

Before talking to your doctor, take an interactive treatment quiz to find out which treatment options might be available to you.

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